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Thursday, 05 April 2018 11:28

New Music Sing Through

music sing through

Tuesday, April 10, 7 pm
in the Sanctuary

Join us as we try out some of the most interesting pieces from the vast music library donated to us by Hope Lutheran Church of Dayton. 

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Monday, 05 March 2018 13:38

Easter & Holy Week

 

Maundy Thursday ~ March 29, 7 pm

Hand and Foot Washing, Prayer and Healing Stations, Holy Communion and Stripping of the Altar

With nightfall our Lenten observance comes to an end, and we gather with Christians around the world to begin the Three Days during which we participate once again in the saving power of Jesus' passing over from death to life. At the heart of the Maundy Thursday liturgy is Jesus' commandment to love one another. As Jesus washed the feet of his disciples, we are called to follow his example as we humbly care for one another, especially the poor and the unloved.

Good Friday ~ March 30, 4:30 & 7 pm

(4:30) An interactive family service for all

(7) A service of Scripture and darkness

At the heart of the Good Friday liturgy is the passion according to John, which proclaims Jesus as a triumphant king who reigns from the cross. The ancient title for this day - the triumph of the cross - reminds us that the church gathers not to mourn this day but to celebrate Christ's life-giving passion and to find strength and hope in the tree of life. In the ancient bidding prayer, we offer petitions for all the world for whom Christ died.

Vigil of Easter ~ March 31, 8:30 pm
St. Anne Episcopal Church
6461 Tylersville Road

This is the night! This is our Passover with Christ from darkness to light, from bondage to freedom, from death to life. The resurrection of Christ is proclaimed in word and sign, and we gather around a pillar of fire, hear ancient stories of our faith, welcome new sisters and brothers at the font, and share the food and drink of the promised land. Raised with Christ, we go forth into the world, aflame with the good news of the resurrection.

Easter Sunday ~ April 1, 8, 9:30, 11 am

with Holy Communion

Christ is risen, indeed! On Easter morning, we stand gaping at the open and empty tomb with the women who followed Jesus throughout his ministry. With the women, we are called to proclaim the amazing news of the resurrection.

 

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Friday, 23 February 2018 11:36

Feast or Fast

Flower Buds

I grew up in the Roman Catholic church and every year during the season of Lent, conversation would swirl about what we were giving up. A lot of people gave up food items – chocolate, meat, soda. Adults might have given up things like alcohol or swearing.

As I grew in my faith education, I learned about giving up things that would help me make roomfor Christ in my life. I could give up an hour of television to study scripture or a book on a Christian topic. I could give up complaining and be a more positive person to be a better example of Christian love. These are still great ideas!

Now that I’ve been a church “professional” for several years, I’ve learned some history about our calendar and how the traditions of seasons like Lent and Advent came to be. Both Lent and Advent were seasons of fastingbefore major holidays. Lent is the 40 days (not counting Sundays) before Easter, and Advent is the 40 days before - you guessed it - Epiphany. If someone reminds me in December, I’ll write another whole post about why it isn’t Christmas. Historically speaking, these 40 day fasts were meant to temper our “worldly desires.”

But we treat the seasons of Advent and Lent very differently. During Advent, we mark off our calendars; in some traditions we go as far as opening little doors to reveal daily treats. What a contrast to the idea of fasting we think of for Lent. We spend the season of Advent anticipating the joy of Christmas. The tradition of fasting, while it gives us opportunities to open ourselves to Christ, can sometimes have the unintended consequence of drawing our focus to our own suffering.

So what if we thought of Lent more like Advent? The eager anticipation. The joy of preparing ourselves, not for new birth, but new life in the resurrection. As we watch the flowers coming back to life, we can be grateful that Christ’s resurrection means we can stand before God, free of our sin. Yes, we can still make room for God in our lives, and we can do it out of the joy gratitude that we have already been saved through Grace, not by our own deeds and suffering.

Published in Blog
Thursday, 21 December 2017 12:55

Silent Night, Holy Night

Christmas Eve Candle Lighting

It is my favorite moment in Christmas worship in every church I’ve gone to. The lights dim, the music starts, everyone gets quiet, and the fire from the Christ candle on the Advent wreath spreads through the church as we pass the flame from candle to candle. Silent Night ...

It was another kind of silence that brought this beloved hymn to life. In 1818 at a chapel near Salzburg, Austria, Christmas preparations were underway when organist Franz Gruber found that the organ had failed and wouldn’t work for Christmas. A young priest, Joseph Mohr, had written some lyrics a couple years earlier and asked Gruber to set them to a tune they could sing easily with guitar accompaniment to replace the organ.

People liked it, but they mostly forgot about it. When the organ was repaired several years later, the organ builder found the music laying with the organ pipes, had it published, and it was a hit!

We are full of expectations during the Christmas season. The perfect gifts. Perfect family time. Perfect music. We’ve spent the entire season of Advent working and waiting for everything to come together, for the wrapping to come off, for school to let out, and to finally light that fifth candle on the Advent wreath so we can share the light of Christmas with each other. Silent Night ... What a testament to the promise of Christmas that even when things don’t go according to plan, we still receive the gift of God’s love.

Celebrate Christmas with us this Sunday at 6, 8, and 11 pm – each of the services will include communion, candle-lighting, and a weepy music director trying to make his way through his favorite song ...

Published in Blog
Monday, 18 December 2017 14:08

First Communion Preparation

 ELW Holy Communion 04 Clip Art 2

Wednesday evening classes
January 10, 17, 24, 31

Worship with First Communion
Followed by a Congregational Luncheon
Sunday, February 4, 2018, 11 am

At Lord of Life, the age of First Communion is a personal decision made in consultation with the Pastor. Many individuals choose 4th grade as an appropriate time for a child, while others may choose to learn at an older or younger age. Anyone, regardless of age, who wishes to begin receiving Holy Communion is welcome to come and explore this awesome mystery! Throughout these four weeks, children and their parents will learn more about communion in engaging ways as we talk about the importance of eating together, explore the use of meals in the Bible, and even bake the type of communion bread that will be used for worship on Sunday, February 4, when we celebrate this faith milestone.

If you believe your child is ready to receive communion, plan to bring them for this series of conversations. At least one parent is encouraged to attend with the child. Please RSVP to the church office by Sunday, January 7.

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Monday, 11 December 2017 14:26

New Year's Eve Worship

New Year's Eve
Sunday, December 31
Worship at 10 am

On Sunday, December 31, one worship service at 10 am will replace our regularly scheduled worship.

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Thursday, 07 December 2017 09:38

Christmas Eve Worship

2017 Christmas Eve Worship Schedule DS 01

 

10 am  Advent Week 4 Worship
12:15 pm

Bilingual Spanish/English
Christmas Eve Worship
6, 8, 11 pm Christmas Eve Worship
   
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Tuesday, 21 November 2017 08:40

Deck our Halls!

Christmas Eve 2016

This Sunday
November 26, 3pm

Join us as we deck our halls for Advent and Christmas.  If you have an extension ladder, please bring it!

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Thursday, 16 November 2017 14:24

Space to Be Holy

jesus icon

In the Orthodox Church, icons (paintings of saints, often on gold backgrounds) are considered a window into the beauty of the kingdom of God. Craftspeople spend decades perfecting their art, learning to make pigments out of natural materials and techniques so their creations last for centuries. They dedicate their talent so the rest of us can step away from our ordinary lives and experience a glimpse of something sacred.

To sanctify something means to set it aside; to make it holy. We give it extra effort, we respect it, we don’t rush it. Sacred art – stained glass windows, fabric vestments on the altar, candles, flowers, statues, church buildings, and so many other offerings crafted by talented artists – draws our attention to scripture, prayer, and worship. We walk into a sacred space with sacred objects and we are inspired to see, hear, and act like the Christians we are called to be.

God is all around us all the time – in nature, at home, at work, in worship. We don’t need anything else to bring us closer to God. But symbols, artwork, and sacred spaces serve as reminders to step out of the secular nature of our lives and be holy. We set aside this space, along with a portion of our time, talents, and treasures, to be sacred.

As we move into the Advent season we'll have extra opportunities at Lord of Life to worship and enjoy our own sacred spaces; and to further lift them up as we decorate for the Christmas season. Watch the schedule for our Advent Adventure midweek worship, Pageant, Blue Christmas, Christmas Eve and Christmas Day worship opportunities.

Published in Blog
Wednesday, 18 October 2017 09:32

All Saints Sunday

candle lit GJmhrDFd

This Sunday, November 5
All Worship Services

Join us in remembering those who have shaped our faith.  

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